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Questions and Answers

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Results 1-10 of 2005
The boring answer is that it is just the generic Slavic word for “skullcap,” which Eastern-European Jews borrowed from their non-Jewish neighbors
“Goniff” is Hebrew and Yiddish for “thief,” and has come to refer to anyone who is a swindler, a cheat or just plain dishonest.
Meshuga means “crazy” in Yiddish. A person who is meshuga is called a meshuganer.
Most communities use six different kinds of trope throughout the year…
Get schlepped in as we tackle this Yiddish word!
I’ve made some mistakes. Well, maybe a lot of them. I’m still young, but I’m afraid to be stuck with this image forever.
Both meanings of the Yiddish word chazer—“pig” and “review”—have their source in the Hebrew language.
I feel frequently discriminated against because of my weight. And I have been the victim of weight-shaming.
Even if the Torah forbids a food, one is still permitted to eat kosher food artificially flavored to taste like it. However, if it closely resembles the non-kosher food, it may be necessary to mark it as an imitation.
To learn why we pray, and how to make prayer a meaningful time to connect with G‑d, join “The Heart of Prayer,” a four-part series sure to deepen your appreciation of Jewish prayer. 1. Question: I feel like a phony saying the prayers when I don’t know if ...